1/2 is a project of artistic exchange between four french artists/graphic designers who live in four european capitals.
1/2 is Laure Boer, Anne-Pauline Mabire, Lucie Pindat and Chloé Thomas.

News

C/O Berlin Book Days 2016

European Months of Photography opening days, Berlin
30 September – 2 October 2016

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Launch 1/2#10 au Bon Accueil

6 June 2014 in Rennes

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“In the Meantime” at Felix &Foam

1–30 May 2014 in Amsterdam
An ever changing installation at Felix &Foam's Collaborate space. Starting at the beginning of May, the installation went hand in hand with the making of the new issue of 1/2 zine in Rennes. On May 23th, the installation is completed by a performance with music and video improvisations.

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Allons voir ailleurs si nous y sommes

Zone Sensible, Saint-Denis
12–13 April 2014
It was in Saint-Denis… a wonderful week-end at Zone Sensible. We were happy to get to know Studio Fludd, Collectif Etc, Céline Saby, Waiting for the sun… and the bees. Here some pictures of our installation, performance and the fantastic place and garden. Thanks Emmanuelle Roule for the invitation!
(Photographs from Zone Sensible)
More photos of the whole event at http://www.zonesensible.org

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Weekender#15: 1/2 Georgia Now!

Olive & Cookie Project Space, Amsterdam
13–15 December 2013

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Salon Multiples

9–10 November 2013 in Morlaix

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Coming soon!

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Unseen Book Market

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Launch 1/2 #9 at the Reading Room of Do You Read Me

Thanks to all of you for coming. It was a very nice evening. It was good to have a bit of Georgia in Berlin. გაისმა!

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Briefmarke

1/2 was invited to take part in the Stamp contest "Österreich neu zeichnen" for the austrian post. We are happy to be in the 15 finalists. Look at the featuring in Die Presse this Sunday.
http://tinyurl.com/nww82nx

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Launch 1/2 #9 Special Tbilisi at Center of Contemporary Art

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1/2 in Tbilisi — Interview #12 — Reso Kiknadze



Who are you?
I am Reso Kiknadze, Georgian composer, saxophone player, computer musician and, at this time, rector of Tbilisi State Conservatoire. Music is actually my “second life”. I first studied classical philology and was about to go to Jena, Germany. They had a very good school for classical philology there at the university. But it did not work, my family didn't conform to the Soviet government. But I remember, I was not very sad about it. My mother had bought me a saxophone and it changed my life... I finished my studies, got a good philology diploma and became a musician.

What makes you or made you do what you do?
I have spent the twenty most intensive years of my life in Germany. When I was still living in Germany, I got a place of assistant professor at the Ilia State University in Tbilisi. I was commuting between Georgia and Germany, planning to relocate my main activities little by little to Georgia. Three years ago my mother died and I felt this as a signal that this ‘bit by bit’ would never work. I had to return immediately.

I came back to Georgia two years ago. Several jazz clubs offered me the possibility to play. It was somehow sad not to have made this step ten years ago. The situation at that time was more unstable so it would have been much easier to change things… And at last, this offer to take over this job at the Conservatoire. I was just asked and I felt I could not say no. This was a chance to take the musical education in Georgia into a new direction.


What is your dream? Or your ambition?
I have a beautiful house in Kakheti which my parents bought and rebuilt when my son was two years old. This is at the border of Georgia and the best place for me to keep my living as I would dream of: watching things, listening to sounds, not getting angry or anxious about something and keep studying. That’s much more important for me than being active in some social or political or educational way.


Could you tell us a childhood memory?
My very first two musical memories: Schubert’s Impromptus Op. 90 no.4 and Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf, when the cat is nearing up to the bird…

Two early electroacoustic memories: there was a radio wire in every house with one station only. Every evening I used to listen to a bedtime story, ending up with a kind of lullaby; it was so loud that it distorted the sound. The other sound is a mix of a drone from a high voltage bunker, not far from our soccer ground, with birds tweet. I can’t consider myself being a musician from my early childhood, but I was listening a lot.


What do you do when you don’t do anything?
I love not doing anything, but I can’t imagine being in a state of complete inactivity. In this ‘not doing’, a lot of ideas and memories rise, even when you’re asleep. You realize you miss your friends, you call them and they come by and you talk about everything and nothing. All my youth, I used to sit and work on a big table full of guests, my friends, my parents’ friends. I was writing parts of my scores, my father-in-law was drawing at the same table, people were coming and going. There was wine, food, chess, discussions, jokes… Working and relaxing at the same time. I would love to keep on doing that.


What is the place in Tbilisi you like the most?
This city is full of memories and love stories. I have loved Tbilisi all the time, even when it was half destroyed. Some people are trying to make the city uglier and uglier but it doesn’t happen. They have built tasteless buildings but the city still remains authentic.


Could you tell us a Georgian personality you find inspiring?
My teacher, Mikho Shughliashvili. He was one of the most important composers. He was the main avant-garde composer in Georgia, despite the lack of information and the overrunning socialistic force in aesthetics at that time. He passed away in 1996 and he still keeps inspiring me in every work.


What inspires you?
For composition I could take anything as an inspiration, because I am not a traditional music writer or music thinker who gets some melody, then writes it down and arranges it for some ensemble. I think art begins in the very first spontaneous vision, in something quite extraordinary, seen in something quite common. It can cause a need or an urge to make this vision visible to others.


Do you see any relationship between your work and the city of Tbilisi?
I see a connection with playing jazz. Playing in this city is completely different than playing in Berlin or in Lübeck or somewhere else. We speak Georgian, so we play something which was born in a completely different linguistic context. Jazz is based on jazz standards and these are actually the songs that everyone in the USA knows. But nobody really knows them in Georgia. We are playing with these standards because jazz musicians play them.

Jazz is also the people you play with. The three young guys with whom I recently created a band, are very talented and energetic. They have a strong vision and somehow they give me an impulse to play better. They are giving the different kind of inspiration that I am searching for. I could not live in a place where I could not play jazz.

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1/2 in Tbilisi — Interview #11 — Vato Urushadze



Who are you?
I am Vato. I recently graduated from the Center of Contemporary Art Tbilisi where I studied Mediation (Context Production). It was an interdisciplinary studies, so we also studied different subjects as photography, audio-visual art etc. Before that I was working as a financial analyst in Citi Bank and Bloomberg. So lately I had a radical career shift and now I'm working at GeoAIR.

What makes you or made you do what you do?
My grandfathers and aunts are all artists. When I was a kid, I was looking how they were painting and sculpting… But then I chose the wrong profession. I was working as a financial analys. I lived and worked for two years in Budapest and during that time I applied for the Art School there. So gradually 
I started to change my mind and at one point, I decided to move back to Georgia. I feel motivated in this environment, I feel desire to do things in here. No finances any more, no business-related things. There is a lot to do in Georgia. Culture and arts need more development, more attention.

What is your dream? or your ambition? 
For years my dream has been to have my own art gallery and studio. It is like a long-term dream or strategy. I also want to see more people around me doing the things they want to do, and living their own dreams and not other people’s dreams.

Could you tell us a childhood memory? 
I had a dog and she was very talented, her name was Pippi. Pippi because of Astrid Lindgren’s book ‘Pippi Longstocking’. And whenever I touched her stomach and scratched it, she ‘sang’ along with me. I was singing and she was singing. Then my sister was born and my father had to take our dog away. It was disappointing. I always have this thought that Pippi is still living somewhere.

What do you do when you don't do anything?
I think. Activity is usually connected with doing something physical, being active or productive. But for me activity has a more passive meaning. Actually you can reach the highest level of activity just in your head. So when I am not doing anything, I look passive but the biggest activity is happening inside me.

What is the place in Tbilisi you like the most?

I like roofs in Tbilisi. In the suburbs, there are sixteen-floor buildings and most of them are accessible. There are great views on the city, on people, on cars. You observe life from above, and nobody spots your presence. You can go up and just be there. It is very calm. I also like Vazha-Pshavela district. I grew up there and it still has a very strong influence on me. This place was built in the 60s. It is not old and it is not new, it is in between. There are Soviet type of blocks, called ‘Khrushovka’ flats. The ceiling is not very high, you can almost touch it, and the overall space is also very small. They have five or eight floors and they are all arranged in a symmetrical way. Between those buildings, there are some fields where neighbors used to grow vegetables and fruits. Having your own garden was more popular in the 90s. Now it is becoming less and less popular, as people don’t have time for that. In our yard there was a big walnut tree and every year the whole neighborhood was gathering walnuts and it was shared equally between the neighbors.

Could you tell us a Georgian personality you find inspiring?
Levan Gigineishvili, a young Georgian philosopher. I have attended his lectures. He inspires me because of his knowledge, his way of thinking. He is a very honest person. He’s just inspiring, it is hard to put into words.


What inspires you?
Individuals inspire me. People who do things which are courageous, or out of the ordinary. People who are not afraid to question taboos and go against limitations and fear. I respect when people say what they think.

Do you see any relationship between your work and the city of Tbilisi?
I think our task is to establish relationships and connections between on the one hand, the citizens of Tbilisi and on the other hand, people who are involved in artistic activities. Because art in Georgia is not very connected to the society. There is a big gap. People don’t go to museums. It seems like culture is not important here. The whole purpose is to make connections and bridge the gap between art and society.

1/2 in Tbilisi — Interview #10 — Tamuna Chabashvili



Who are you?

My name is Tamuna Chabashvili and I am a visual artist. 

What makes you or made you do what you do?
It was partly a coincidence and partly a choice. The chaotic situation in the country and the despair—with the civil war, the school that I attended got burned down, the education system was in total decline—brought me to the doors of an art school. Once I entered, I felt very comfortable. I think art offered me more possibilities than any other profession could give. So ever since I am in arts. Having experienced the education system of two art schools and Tbilisi State Academy of Arts, I realized that I had to continue my search outside Georgian borders. That’s how I ended up in the Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, where I lived and worked professionally for fifteen years. I was forced to leave the country in search for a better education and a platform to develop and practice my art. That kept me always curious about Georgia. I always wanted to reconnect with my life in Georgia and try to work there as well. Now, I am 35 years old and feel ready to face all the fears that I have left behind when I was 19 and see what I can gain from that.

What is your dream? or your ambition? 
I guess my ambition and my dream is to merge these two worlds I live in— West and East—and articulate this experience inside my work.

Could you tell us a childhood memory? 
When I was young I could see people—ghosts—that nobody else could see. Later, I figured out that it could have been caused by a lack of phosphorus in my body, but who knows… Maybe it was part of my rich imagination. Until the age of nine, I was very much afraid of darkness and staying alone. My mother took me to her friend, who practiced shamanism. She lived not so far from us. She made me sit on a chair, hold a bowl of water and stayed quiet. I don’t know what exactly happened but since then, they all vanished.

What do you do when you don't do anything?
Even if you don’t do anything you still do something, as long as you are conscious. I like to complain that I don’t do much, but I think that it has to do more with trusting myself than the work itself.

What is the place in Tbilisi you like the most?

Well, it changes according to my state of mind. At the moment I like the place I live in. It’s on the hill and overlooks the entire city. It feels like being inside and at the same time outside of the city.

Do you see any relationship between your work and the city of Tbilisi?
I am in the process of discovering it right now, that’s one of the reasons why I am here, to trace the connections. My latest work is very much based on the western context, certain questions that are born out of western environment and particularly, the Netherlands. But I am convinced that I inherit a lot of influences from this city.

Could you tell us a Georgian personality you find inspiring?
I think one of the most inspiring things, is the ability to improvise during the hardship and manage to go on.


What inspires you?

People.

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1/2 in Tbilisi — Interview #9 — Sophia Lapiashvili



Who are you?
I am Sophia Lapiashvili, I work at GeoAIR. Managing several projects and partly in the residency program. I am a cultural manager. 

What makes you or made you do what you do?
It was just my interest to work in this field. I wanted for a long time to be involved in residency programs. Actually, my interest for contemporary art came through my voluntary job in Switzerland. I studied Art History and I just visited one exhibition in Basel. It was so amazing for me, I just went to the director and asked to get non-paid voluntary job there. So I started to work there and it was the first step when I entered in the Contemporary Art field. Afterwards, with friends who were dealing with homeless children, we decided to build a residency outside of Tbilisi where they live. We wanted to combine this two components together. We started to think about the residency program, involving the homeless children and we were looking for money. So the interest of the residency comes through this project.

What is your dream? Or your ambition?
I don’t know. I don’t think about global ideas that I wanted to reach. I am quite happy with my life. I just think about having a structured job and not to think permanently about funding and how to survive. This is the main point what makes me feel uncomfortable in my professional life.  On the other hand, I want to be connected with ecology and countryside. This is like dream to have a small country house, to have much more time to carry on ecological issues.

Could you tell us a childhood memory?
I can tell you my childhood in Abkhazia. My family from my mother’s side is from Abkhazia which we lost like 20 years ago. It is in West Georgia, on the Black Sea, near Russia. It is a conflict region. We spent every year the whole summer. It is painful when I am thinking that it does not exist anymore as it is in my memory. It was very nice. This surrounding which was there, the people who lived there, the families, the relationships, even the houses and city structure, the environment… it is not any more in this condition. It is very sad for me. There are no Georgians anymore, just Abkhazians. There are Georgians who are registered as Abkhazians and having Russian passport, they are not speaking Georgian anymore. We cannot go anymore and people who lived there either died, or were moved from the place. It’s totally abandoned, even our house, I do not know if it is still standing there.

What do you do when you don't do anything?
I do something all the time. Even when people ask me what I do in my free time, when I am thinking about it, I don’t really have a free time. Also because of my family. If I am not working, I am busy with the kids. I don’t have private time to use just for myself.

What is the place in Tbilisi you like the most?
Gudiashvili square. When I discovered this place, it was for me like a dream. Because it was very quite in the middle of the center of the city and surrounded with very nice buildings. I remember when I first discovered this place, I went every evening there, it had something very special. It became too popular and it lost the soul because of the renovation. It is still nice. Everyone likes it, but there are already two building which are completely destroyed.

Do you see any relationship between your work and the city of Tbilisi?
Yes, definitely. Because we are also dealing a lot with socially engaged projects and urban problems and it is quite related to each other. I wish I was more active in this field. To be closer to the city in terms of populations and urban planning.

Could you tell us a Georgian personality you find inspiring?
My husband. He is a molecular biologist. I think he is a very interesting person. Not because he is my husband, but in general. You can share with him everything and you can deliver any kind of ideas from any kind of field and talk about everything. It makes also the relationship comfortable, that you can really rely on his ideas.

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